Fighting Chess with Magnus Carlsen

By Adrian Mikhalchishin and Oleg Stetsko

Translated and edited by Ken Neat

Edition Olms, 2011

ISBN: 9783283010201

Fighting Chess with Magnus Carlsen

Magnus Carlsen, the current world champion, is the best thing to come out of Norway since Ole Gunnar Solksjaer.

This book collects together 64 of his best games, played mainly against top-class opposition. His opponents include Anand, Kramnik, Topalov, Adams and Morozevich. He’s not always victorious, a fair proportion of the games being draws. However, this shows off one of Carlsen’s strengths as a player: he’s adept at defence, and consequently very difficult to beat. In game 45, for example, he is bested by Beliavsky (this is their encounter at the 2008 Olympiad) but, still, he hangs in there. And when the older man tires, giving Carlsen an opportunity to bail out, he leaps free. They share the point.

Despite the ‘fighting chess’ phrase in the title, Carlsen’s classical style is closer to Capablanca or even Karpov than the all-out aggression of (say) Kasparov in his prime. Naturally, he can carry out a kingside attack if it’s warranted, but he’s more likely to win through positional or even technical means. It is high quality stuff, mind, just a mite boring sometimes.

It was said once that Capablanca played like a machine. In the introductory chapter where the authors trace Carlsen’s development as a player, they describe him similarly as the ‘Hero of the Computer Era’; and actually there is something silicon-like about his style. Perhaps it is something to do with the almost complete objectivity of his decision-making.

Still only in his 20s, Carlsen can only get better and stronger. That’s what is difficult to comprehend fully: the best is yet to come.
For an appreciation of Magnus Carlsen as a chessplayer, this fine collection of deeply annotated games fits the bill perfectly. The publisher’s description of Fighting Chess with Magnus Carlsen can be read here.

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